Tourists big depositors in city’s bank account

This article first appeared in the Monday, June 5, 1989 edition of the “Ojai Valley News” on Page A-1. It is reprinted here with their permission. The author is unknown.

Tourists big depositors in city’s bank account

Like it or not, Ojai is a tourist town and the city is becoming more and more dependent on the taxes visitors pay.

City Manager Andy Belknap, who has prepared the tentative budget for 1989-90, said three revenue sources — property tax, sales tax and bed tax — account for 64.4 percent, or nearly two thirds, of the city’s $2,852,000 general fund.

The bed tax is tied directly to tourism and the sales tax is indirectly related.

The bed tax has become increasingly important in the past 10 years, Belknap noted.

In the 1979-80 budget, he said, it accounted for 7.5 percent of general fund revenues, but in the new fiscal year it will amount to 17.2 percent, an increase of 229 percent in a decade.

The bed tax was increased by a third in 1985 and this accounts for some of the increase, but Belknap said the figures still show more and more tourists are coming to Ojai and leaving their tax dollars behind — an anticipated $490,000 in the new fiscal year.

Sales tax figures also point to the impact of tourism on Ojai. About 25 percent of the general fund comes from the sales tax, a figure that has remained relatively constant over the years, but per capita comparisons tell a different story.

Ojai had the third highest sales tax per capita in Ventura County for the fourth quarter of 1988, according to the State Board of Equalization. Belknap noted the per capita figure for Ojai of $2,017 was exceeded only by the cities of Ventura and Thousand Oaks, both of which have regional shopping centers.

These retail centers account for much of those communities’ sales tax revenues, Belknap said, noting that Ojai lacks such a center.

And, Ojai’s annual growth rate of .64 of a percent makes it the slowest growing community in Ventura County. This, said Belknap, means that a populations shift is not accounting for the sales tax locally.

The manager said all this is a mixed blessing for Ojai. While it brings money into city coffers, it also makes the city vulnerable to economic shifts.

The tourist-based economy puts a strain on several city services. Traffic is the most obvious, according to the manager, but there are others as well.

Belknap said he would like to see Ojai approach the situation by building a large budget reserve for bad times and to diversify the local economy.

Belknap used the Oxnard city budget by way of comparison.

Oxnard’s reserves equal about 15 percent of its annual budget, while Belknap is trying to build a 30 percent reserve locally.

In terms of revenue sources, the manager noted that property, sales and bed taxes account for less than 40 percent of Oxnard’s general fund compared to roughly two-thirds in Ojai.

Belknap cited Houston as an example of a city that relied on a single-based economy. When the bottom fell out of the oil market, Houston’s economy collapsed.

The answer for Ojai is to be conservative, Belknap said, adding the city must expand it economic base and increase its reserve for bad times.

Memories of times before freeways recall life as simple, safe

The following article first appeared in the Wednesday, May 17, 1995 edition of the “Ojai Valley News” on Page A-8. It is reprinted here with their permission. The author, Lee Strohbehn, was a longtime dentist with a practice in the Ojai Valley. The photo of Dr. Storhbehn was added by the “Ojai Valley Museum”.

The Golden Years
Memories of times before freeways recall life as simple, safe
by
Lee Strohbehn

Before freeways, was it only the exuberance and vitality of spirit of young parents that drew us to downtown L.A.?

Some of the fondest memories I have are those when my wife and I took our family to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. How well I remember Richard Kiley and the Man of La Mancha at the Mark Taper Forum and Ingrid Bergman at the Amanson Theatre.

And the concerts — we were there to see Zubin Meta conduct and to hear the L.A. Phiharmonic. And afterward to take the family to dinner right there at the Music Center, or to a favorite, Edwards Steak House on Alvarado St.

Let’s do lunch
And then there were trips to the Hollywood Bowl. What a delight, to take a lunch and sit high up under the stars to listen to programs which, as a farm-bred Iowa boy, I never thought I or my family could be part.

As parents, we had a feeling of fulfillment to realize that our three children enjoyed these experiences as much as we did and that we could provide them.

Life was affordable
Admission prices at that time seemed affordable. Nor did I have the feeling the environment was unsafe, or that the drive home late at night was an ordeal.

How times change! How could I afford those adventures now for five people?

And if Edwards Steak House were still there, I wouldn’t dare take my family to a restaurant on Alvarado. Somehow to drive the freeways, especially at night, is daunting to me now.

As our family grew older and we began to rely more on local entertainment events, Frank Salazar came along and the Ventura County Symphony orchestra was born. We subscribed immediately as charter members.

How delightful it was to recognize Ojai’s Frank Roller and his violin, Dorothea Walker and her cello, and Lavonne Theriault and her drums down there among all the other Ventura County musicians. We truly felt linked to beautiful programs.

I’m one of those untalented people who knows nothing about music but enjoys it endlessly. There are times when I lose myself, when I’m oblivious to everything around me and I feel one with a composer who has struck the chords I like. I cherish those moments.

Oldies missed
I confess that I was confused when Maestro Salazar left the orchestra. I had, in a sense, matured with him musically and I must say I miss him. I understand there has been a parallel experience for those audiences who have been attending performances of the Conejo Valley Symphony Orchestra.

Now those two orchestras are undergoing further transition. The apparent objective of those behind the podiums is to produce a “World Class” orchestra by combining talent and weeding out those who do not perform to and exclusive standard. I have heard that they hope to attract excellence from outside the area.

My limited knowledge of music doesn’t allow me to discriminate the finer levels of quality. I always enjoyed Frank Roller’s violin but I seriously doubt that his talent would have allowed him to survive the judgments that must be made to seat one orchestra instead of two in Ventura County.

I love Ojai’s summer band concerts on Wednesday nights in Libbey Park. I like the sound and revel in the incomparable social ambiance.

Memories linger
I used to feel something akin to that when the Ventura County Symphony was young, especially when I could bond with Roller’s violin. Although Frank isn’t with us now, his memory still lingers and epitomizes a homegrown spirit I miss in the Orchestra.

“World Class,” if it means change in community participation, simply doesn’t mean that much to me. I’m sorry to see the Ventura County Symphony Orchestra elevated to a class conscious status beyond my ability to enjoy or afford.

Lee Strohbehn

OVN’s Van Houten honored for sharing city’s history

The following article first appeared in the Friday, November 13, 2020 edition of the “OJAI VALLEY NEWS” on page A1. The article is reprinted here with their permission.

OVN’s Van Houten honored for sharing city’s history
by
Austin Widger
awidger@ojaivalleynews.com

The Ojai Valley News’ very own senior reporter Perry Van Houten has been recognized with the city of Ojai Annual Historic Preservation Award for 2020.

Van Houten, along with Darwin McCredie, had his Historic Preservation Commission recommendation for the award ratified by the Ojai City Council on Nov. 10.

Van Houten was granted the award because he met the criteria for historical research, including oral history supporting historic preservation.

When asked what the award meant to him, Van Houten said: “It’s a real honor to receive this award from the city. My interest in Ojai history was sparked by Patricia Fry’s “The Ojai Valley: An Ilustrated History,’ and later, after I began exploring the valley, Fred Volz’s ‘Ojai Hikes.’ Credit for these historical articles really goes to the folks at the Ojai Valley Museum: the late David Mason, Dawn Thieding, Wendy Barker, Craig Walker, Elise DePuydt, Judy Mercer and Drew Mashburn. And, of course, many thanks to the Ojai Valley News for supporting my interest in the history of our valley.”

The resolution stated: “Perry Van Houten has long been involved in Ojai’s historical preservation. Back in the days of (Ojai historian) David Mason, Mr. Van Houten tirelessly interviewed David for articles appearing in the Ojai Valley Visitors Guide (such as Ojai’s historic gas stations) and could often be found in the Ojai Valley Museum Library poring over 100-year-old publications and historical images from the museum archives. Mr. Van Houten also moderated Ojai Valley Museum’s Town Talks making Ojai’s history come alive.”

Van Houten continues to document Ojai history to this day with his in-depth historical articles in the Ojai Valley News and the Ojai Magazine. His excellence in reporting was recognized by the California News Publishers Association when his oral history profile piece, “Sole Survivor,” received second place among all California weekly newspapers with 4,300 or fewer subscribers.

The resolution continued: “Following in OVN past-publisher Fred Volz’s footsteps, Mr. Van Houten has been particularly keen on preserving Ojai’s natural history. He has researched and documented unique and historical Ojai trees as well as local hiking trails. His OVN Hiking Trails column earned him the OVN Best of Ojai ‘Favorite Columnist’ in 2018. Mr. Van Houten also lends his hands and energies to United States Forest Trail Projects and Keep Sespe Wild Highway Cleanups and leads free hikes as a docent with the Ojai Valley Land Conservancy.”

The resolution concluded: “Mr. Van Houten’s historical research efforts culminate in the publication of articles that promote and preserve the City of Ojai’s unique historical and cultural heritage. His balanced and accurate reporting of the news of today creates the history of tomorrow.”

The city plans to award Van Houten with a plaque at a City Council meeting in January.

In addition to the Historic Preservation Award recipients, Don and Sheila Cluff, and Patricia Clark Doerner received the Historic Preservation Lifetime Achievement Award.

‘His balanced and accurate reporting of the news today creates the history of tomorrow.’

— Resolution honoring Van Houten


Artists in Paradise

“Topa Topa Bluffs” pastel on paper by Alberta “Bert” Collins.
Permanent Collection, Ojai Valley Museum

This essay by Anca Colbert originally appeared in “Ojai Studio Artists – 3 Decades” a book published in  2013. Colbert is an art adviser, curator, writer, and long-time resident of Ojai. It is published here with Colbert’s permission.  ©2013 Anca Colbert – All Rights Reserved. 

This book offers a glimpse into the lives of 60 artists who live and work in Ojai, a small town, more of a village really, nestled in a fertile mountain valley surrounded by nature of breathtaking beauty and bathed in legendary light. Together as members of the Ojai Studio Artists, yet always alone as individuals, they weave stories reflecting their life and their vision in this magical place.

Consider the spectrum of artists in this group. Stylistically, they represent a vast range of visual arts creativity, from figuration and hyperrealism to expressionism and abstraction, from traditional to experimental, from plein-air to political. They use most media: painting in oil, acrylic, encaustic or pastel; drawing with pen and ink; printmaking; photography; collage; assemblage; making sculptures, ceramics, pottery.

If one of art’s highest purposes is to ask questions of those making it and of those experiencing it, it seems relevant to ask questions about the OSA group: why does it exist? And why here?

Geography and nature have much to do with the group’s existence. Ojai, an old Chumash Indian outpost, was always a land cultivated for its agricultural abundance. In the late 19th century it was embraced by many newcomers for its beneficial climate. During the 20th century it became a magnet for educators, writers, artists, celebrities, creatives in all fields, and seekers of life’s meaning and higher purpose.

By now Ojai is renowned as a fertile paradise for its orchards and its artists.

My first visit to Ojai was an invitation to lunch at Beatrice Wood’s. It was the early 1970s. I had just moved from Paris to Los Angeles, and Beatrice had just moved to her new house and studio in the Upper Valley, facing the Topa Topas. I was mesmerized by Beatrice’s iridescent luster glazes and whimsical sculptures, and charmed by her conversation and personality. On that very first trip I fell under the spell of the Ojai Valley.

Why have so many visual artists chosen to settle here? Ojai is a place unlike most others. Those drawn to this valley have a strong sense of belonging here, of living in an earthly haven. A few other art communities are famous for their singular settings. Taos comes to mind. The Hudson Valley. St. Paul de Vence. Similarities abound: natural beauty, spiritual energy, space, silence, light quality, a protected environment, a gentler life than in the cities, yet a convenient proximity to important art centers.

Artists use their imagination to create worlds: theirs, and ours. The process is fraught with uncertainty and doubts about the purpose of their life work, about exposing it and exhibiting it, about financial survival, about recognition. That takes courage. A support system is essential. Ojai offers a nurturing environment for all creatives, but members of OSA choose to participate in a somewhat structured community of kindred souls. Their homes and studios are within minutes from each other. So they meet, they party, they talk, they bond.

For “Reflections,” an OSA group exhibition organized by the Ojai Valley Museum in 2013, the museum asked participating artists to ponder what it meant for them to belong to the group. The painter Elisse Pogofsky-Harris wrote on that occasion: “Art making for me is a solitary undertaking, which being an only child, suits me well. But as I journey down the path my paintings require I follow, I am grateful that there is an OSA to provide the possibility of having colleagues, peers and even friends with whom to share moments of joy as well as times when the muse is hiding.”

Being an artist carries the central contradiction of a self-enclosed, isolated life trying to connect with others in the world. Not an easy balancing act. As Georgia O’Keeffe famously wrote: “I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way – things I had no words for.” Artists tend to favor solitary lives, and usually do not like to talk about their work. Yet here they come together once a year in October for the OSA Tour.

The tour has drawn thousands to Ojai over the years. Most art lovers cherish the opportunity of being welcomed into the artists’ studios, to connect with them in an intimate manner: It’s a highly charged personal experience, one of immersion into that individual life, work and environment. The power of images in an intimate setting has a singular quality far different from their effect in public museum spaces, or in the often desensualized world of big city galleries, or in the all-encompassing, fast-paced, consumer-oriented international art fairs, which in recent years have changed the nature, geography and economics of the art world.

Picasso’s comment about art being “just another way of keeping a diary” rings true as one looks at the stories told by this group of OSA artists. As painters, sculptors, photographers, et al., they leave a palpable trace of what they see and what they feel. Yes, artists do tell stories: about fruits and vegetables; mountains and skies; their loved ones, dreams and visions. The thread of a singular life’s story interwoven with others creates the fabric of their connection. It keeps changing slowly under our eyes, just as do the shifting rays of light in this valley.

Intangible Spirit of The Ojai (No. 1)

The following article first appeared on June 6, 1961 in a newspaper that became the “Ojai Valley News”. The article is reprinted here with the permission of the “Ojai Valley News”. The author is Ed Wenig. Wenig wrote a series titled “Intangible Spirit of The Ojai”. He did not title each of his articles. Therefore, the “Ojai Valley Museum” has added “(No. 1)” to the title to distinguish it here from other articles with the same name. 

Intangible Spirit of The Ojai (No. 1)
by
Ed Wenig

DENNISON ENTRANCE — Earl Lively, caretaker of Dennison Park, points to a huge 40 ton rock pushed into place at entrance to park by pioneer Tom McGuire.

Beautiful, oak-covered Dennison Park is known throughout the Ojai Valley as a “family” park –– a place where people can come for quiet and rest. Earl Lively, park caretaker, points out that while other parks, by demand, have concessions in food and drinks and facilities for games and entertainment, there is only great natural beauty to lure the visitor to Dennison Park.

From the several lookouts on the 33 acre expanse at the top of the Dennison grade, one sees two entire Ojai Valleys — Lower and the Upper — simply by turning around. It is no wonder that in 1924, when the Dennison family deeded the property to the county the local paper stated, “A more beautiful and charming park site could not be found in the county.”

There is some significance to the picture above showing Mr. Lively pointing to a spot on the huge rock at the park entrance. For he, along with members or the Dennison family and other pioneers have often wondered why the plaque that was promised by the supervisors of 1924 was never made, or, if made, was never fastened to the rock 37 years ago.

In 1924, the year the county supervisors accepted the property as a park, and Tom McGuire of the Upper Ojai was ordered by the Board to bring this 40-ton rock from the east to the west side of the new grade road, as a unique and permanent entrance marker. “This I did,” said McGuire recently, “and what a job it was for my cat of that year! I understood that a special bronze plate was to be securely fastened to the rock explaining, and commemorating the generous gift of the Dennison family. Why it was never completed I, nor anyone else, has ever found out.”

According to Mr. Lively, the park site seems to have been a favorite camping place and home for at least three different and unrelated Indian cultures. While historians may write their speculations of the long, unrecorded past, Mr. Lively takes pleasure in showing visitors the mortars on a huge rock made undoubtedly by the Oak Grove Indians, the first Indian culture of 10,000 or more years ago. Then he describes the second culture, the so-called Hunter Indians, who, with bow and arrow and stone ax were able to hunt large animals for food, clothing and housing.

But when caretaker Lively talks about the third Indian culture, the Canalinos or Chumash, a note of sadness creeps into his voice. “With the coming of the white man, with his impatience, his faster way of living, and his disregard of nature’s balance, the Chumash disappeared. But, with real enthusiasm, Lively concluded: “I Like Dennison Park. It’s still a little world all of its own, high up here between two lovely valleys, just as it was for the Oak Grove, the Hunters, and the Chumash. When I occasionally find artifacts of one or the other of the three cultures, I go back in my imagination to the days of long ago when this little mountain top was a real paradise for the Indians.”

Chariot races were exciting events

The following article first appeared in the “Ojai Valley News”. The exact date is unknown, but its author, Ed Wenig, wrote a regular history column for that newspaper in the 1970’s. The article is reprinted here with the permission of the “Ojai Valley News”.

Chariot races were exciting events
by
Ed Wenig


“One of the outstanding incidents of the (Ventura County) fair was the winning of the chariot race by Tom Clark of Ojai in the world’s record time of 52 seconds. Tom claims that, knowing he had the race well in hand, he held his horses up. If he had chosen to let them go his time would have been somewhere around 51 seconds.”

This was the exultant report in THE OJAI on September 24, 1926. The colorful county supervisor for the Ojai district had once again distinguished himself in the field of horsemanship. This time his achievement was significant enough to warrant a special article in the Boston Globe, which told of the new world record.

In those days chariot races were truly exciting events. The drivers were garbed in ancient Roman costumes, and the chariots, patterned after the ones used in the Colosseum of Rome, rattled magnificently by on their wooden wheels.

Stage Coach Driver
Tom Clark, whether dressed in a Roman toga or in conventional modern attire, was always a colorful personality. As a teenager he had become a driver of stage coaches between Ventura, Ojai, and Santa Barbara. To the fashionable winter patrons of the Foothills Hotel the ride in his stagecoach from railroad station of Santa Barbara or Ventura was a much-anticipated event.

Many were the holiday expeditions piloted by Tom Clark. No matter how tortuous the road or how many streams there were to be forded, no one ever had the slightest doubt that Tom Clark would be in complete control of his horses and stagecoach. His livery stable at the corner of Signal Street and Ojai Avenue was the starting point of many trips both by stagecoach and horseback throughout Southern California.

His daughter, Elizabeth, now living in Santa Ana, recalls the joyous expedition of her Nordhoff High School graduating class to Wheeler’s Hot Springs. Two tallyhos were employed, one driven by her father, and one by her uncle, William Clark. The road was so winding that often the lead horses could not be seen by the passengers as they turned the corners. She recalls that at a moment of great excitement came when a Stanley Steamer approached on a blind curve, and it required all the skill of the drivers to keep their horses from bolting at the encounter.

THOMAS S. CLARK 1865 – 1940
Ready to race is Tom Clark.

District board nixes landmark status

The following article first appeared in the Saturday, June 21, 1986 edition of the “Ojai Valley News” on Page A-1. It is reprinted here with their permission.

San Antonio School
District board nixes landmark status
by T.C. Mitchell


A building commonly recognized in the Ojai Valley by residents as being a historical landmark will not get that official designation from the Cultural Heritage Board if the Board of Education has its way.

WHILE MEMBERS of the Ojai Unified School District school board believe as a group that it would be nice to have the San Antonio Elementary School recognized officially as a landmark of historical significance, the board will not willingly let that happen.

In discussing the designation at last week’s board meeting, Boardmember Robert Tholl said he felt the designation would restrict the district’s ability to make changes in the future. He said he didn’t want to commit future school boards to the limitations for construction, rebuilding and remodeling that the historical designation presents.

According to ordinance, before any building designated a historical landmark can be altered, notification of specific plans must be given to the Cultural Heritage Board 12 months prior to any work ever being done. School boardmembers last week said they feared that would limit changes that could be made in the future to the school, and it would require future boards to go through the county Cultural Heritage Board to have changes made at the site.

David Mason, member of the county Cultural Heritage Board, said last week that the board’s decision is not a major setback. “I don’t think there’s any danger of them (school district) tearing it down. I doubt anybody would make an issue of it. It’s important to the Ojai Valley, and I would fill the board meeting room with protesters if I heard they were going to bulldoze it down. But I don’t think it’s going to happen.”

MASON SAID the school was built in 1926 and was designed by Santa Paula architect Roy Wilson, a noted designer in Ventura County. The school replaced a Victorian design that was built in 1892, said Mason. The Victorian replaced the original school moved there in 1887 when the San Antonio School District was formed. The first school, according to Mason, was a granary.

So the school site is nearly 100 years old, adding to its significance locally. But Mason said the school board assured him during its June 3 meeting that the school was not going to be torn down.

“If they (school district) do decide to sell the property, I would like to do something. Maybe meet with the new owners or something,” Mason said. Beyond his duties as chair of the Ojai Cultural Heritage Board and as a member of the county Heritage Board, Mason also has a personal interest in the school. He attended there through the sixth grade, and so did his mother before him.

By law, the Cultural Heritage Board is not required to have the property owner’s permission to designate a building a historical landmark. But Mason said he didn’t think the county board would make an issue of designating the school as long as the school district is in possession. Should that change, Mason said designation proceedings can take place very rapidly in order to spare one of the Ojai Valley’s historical assets.

DISTRICT BOARD gave thumbs down on naming San Antonio School a landmark. (T. C. Mitchell photo)

Technology vs. nature’s wisdom


The following article first appeared in the Sunday, February 26, 1978 edition of the “Ojai Valley News” on Page A-12. The article is re-printed here with their permission.

Technology vs. nature’s wisdom

————————-
Our environment
————————-
by John E. Nelson, M.D.

As the torrents of water which fell from the sky eased a bit and we all surveyed the damage to the manmade artifacts surrounding our lives, we could not help but be reminded of our closeness — and vulnerability — to the forces of nature.

Especially sad was the story of the family who lovingly labored with their own hands for nearly two years to build a beautiful new home near a picturesque stream. They had moved in a scant two days before that stream turned into a raging river, severely damaging their house and converting much of their property into a rocky wasteland.

Mankind has traditionally viewed itself as a species whose technology could potentially free it from such whims of nature. An illusion to be sure, this way of thinking has been carried to extremes in our cities where it is possible to exist for weeks without seeing a tree.

Isolated in concrete apartments and steel vehicles, citydwellers feel safe from nature, but vulnerable to each other. So they reinforce their windows with bars and watch television, only to witness scenes of freeways clogged with miles of cars buried under snow and of their neighbors freezing to death in their apartments when the electricity failed.

Here in our rural Ojai Valley we have so far been able to keep in close enough contact with primal energies to know better. We can see firsthand that the primary rule of all nature is change, and that this rule must be respected at all costs.

THIS VALLEY’S RECENT floods began in a monumental change witnessed by no human. The awesome energy of the water we all watched pass through our lives was actually imparted to it hundreds of millions of years ago when the Topa Topa mountains to our north were thrust above the ocean floor by forces we can barely imagine.

Since that time, nature has changed those mountains and our valley with each rainfall, etching first rivulets in the hard rock which became gorges which became canyons in the foothills, finally emerging as fertile alluvial fans covering most of the valley basin.

And simply because we have built houses here in the last 150 years, these changes will not cease. Our best technology will not stop them. We can only seek to understand them so that we ourselves may change in harmony with them.

One means we have developed to help us understand how man-made changes relate to natural changes is the Environmental Impact Report (EIR). By law, an EIR must be ordered by any agency who must rule on changes which may have a “substantial adverse impact” on our environment. A well-prepared EIR will bring expert minds to bear on the potential problems inherent in any anticipated change.

A good idea. But obviously, the words “substantial” and “Adverse” are open to interpretation by the powers-that-be who can file a “negative declaration” allowing them to bypass this vital process. This is often done with shortsighted impunity, such as recently occurred when the city and county planned to chop down 17 trees to widen and reroute South Montgomery Street.

Fortunately, a public outcry put a halt to that misguided project.

BUT MORE CHALLENGES are forthcoming. The recent floods will undoubtedly renew efforts for concrete channelization of the waterways which course through our valley. Those who seek to establish the primacy of technology over the wisdom of nature will argue that these sterile Los Angles-type canals are necessary to protect our homesites.

The futility of such thinking was recently demonstrated on Old Creek Road where the county decided to “improve” a natural river-bed crossing with a high concrete edifice. Although a lot and homesite just downstream survived the great floods of 1935 and 1969, this time the water cascaded across the new obstacle in its path, crashing down to opposite side with such force that it formed a giant whirlpool which swept away 20 feet of the lot.

Such events make clear the fact that all the desirable and safe homesites in the Ojai Valley are already filled. The only way we can cram more people in is to put then in precarious perches or destroy the few remaining undeveloped green belts and natural water channels.

Rather than changing nature to create an illusion of safety, wouldn’t it be better to let nature’s inevitable wisdom shape our future changes?

THE EXTREMES of nature which turn a peaceful river valley into a raging flood path help to teach us the need for thorough environmental planning. (Seba photo)

Water candidates tackle key issues

The following article first appeared on the front page of the Sunday, February 26, 1978 edition of the “Ojai Valley News”. It is reprinted here with their permission .

Water candidates tackle key issues
Editor’s note: At 7 p.m. on March 1, Candidates George Purvis and Earl Hansen will square off in a candidate’s night sponsored by the Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce at World University.
by Tom Murphy

In the March 7 election, voters in District 4 of the Casitas Municipal Water District (Oak View and surrounding areas) will vote on a recall movement against their representative to the district’s board. Earl Hansen is a man who does not want to be recalled. His opponent, George Purvis, claims to be a man who does not even want to run, but has led the move to have Hansen ousted.

Purvis started working on water issues in 1945 when he first moved to Oak View with his wife and realized there was very little water to be had. In 1952 he became publicity chairman for the steering committee of what is now CMWD. He was elected to the board of directors when the district incorporated in 1952 and did not step down until his retirement in 1970.

“THIS IS THE last thing I ever wanted to do, to come back to the board. You’ll have to take my word on that. I thought some knowledgeable person would come forth and run. We need somebody who is knowledgeable and ready to go to work,” says Purvis, in explanation of his campaign bid.

As leader of the Oak View Utilities Investigation Committee (OVUIC), Purvis has promoted the recall movement, which has two basic complaints about present district policy. The first is the proposed conjunctive use agreement with the City of Ventura. The second is the disparity between water rates for residential, commercial and agricultural users.

The conjunctive use agreement would grant Ventura up to 6,000 acre-feet of water per year from Casitas Dam if the water they were able to draw from the Ventura Rivera at Foster Park should ever fall below that figure. The water would be delivered free of charge. In exchange, the district would be able to divert 20 cubic feet of water per second into the Los Robles Diversion Canal from the river.

PURVIS MAINTAINS that the agreement is designed to ward off a threatened riparian rights lawsuit by Ventura against the district and could leave the district without a sufficient water supply during droughts. He also says the pact may spark similar agreements with other riparian users.

GEORGE PURVIS

The challenger claims that the 20 cubic feet per second the district would get in return would not make up the possible 6,000 acre-foot loss. He also condemns the free water allocation saying the district might incur pumping costs to give Ventura the last of the district water is a severe drought hit.

The second matter revolves around a district rate structure Purvis says was designed by Hansen and former director (and now planning commissioner) Glenn Zogg, who recently endorsed Hansen in the upcoming vote. Pumping rates in the district, which used to vary dependent on the user’s proximity to the supply, are now equalized and charges for water by different users vary widely depending on the use.

According to present rates, Purvis says, a domestic user pays $161 per acre-foot of water. Under a commercial discount, businesses get the water for just $61 per acre-foot , and agricultural users get the biggest saving of all buying their water for just $25 per acre-foot under a discount similar to the Land Conservation Act’s decreased taxing scheme.

Purvis attacks the rates as discriminatory and notes that the rates for agricultural users do not even cover the cost of pumping and storage. In making up the difference, he claims, the other district customers are actually subsidizing agriculture.

EARL HANSEN

RESIDENTS in District 4 used to pay only $8.77 per acre-foot of water to cover pumping charges in the district because they are located in the region closest to the lake. Residents in the Upper Ojai used to pay significantly more. Now the rate is $39 throughout CMWD.

Purvis charges that one of Hansen’s efforts in office as the District 4 representative has been to equalize the rates for all district customers and that this effort has significantly raised the pumping rates in the district as a result.

As the target of the recall, Hansen is in an obvious defensive position. He is upset by the recall because it is aimed at him personally instead of at the board as a whole.

“A lot of people ask me why I just don’t chuck it. Well, I can’t. All I want to do is vindicate myself. And I intend to run again. Of course, if the recall is successful, that may change,” he says.

He answers Pruvis’ complaints about the water rate differentials by saying he merely went along with the board’s decision to adopt the rates, and is not singly responsible for them, though he admits he and Zogg were “probably” on the committee that recommended them to the board.

On the question of the pumping charges, Hansen replies that the single rate system was recommended by a consultant hired when Purvis was on the board and that if makes sense when considering that the differing pumping costs to the district were gradually diminishing due to fluctuations in energy costs and that the cost of pumping in Oak View was lower than the Upper Ojai partly because so much water was being pumped to the Upper Ojai.

Hansen says he is upset by the recall because is it costing the district between $2,500 and $3,000 which will have to be paid by the consumers and he notes there has been no effort to start a recall in any other district, though the issues are virtually the same throughout the district.

ON THE offensive, Hansen asserts that he was responsible for obtaining a new water system for the Oak View area after Purvis failed to do so while on the board, that he helped to cancel the district’s debt from the old Rio Vista Water Company customers, he is actively pursuing the provision of district land for the Oak View Community Center, he has aggressively sought to protect water quality and supply while a director, and he is partly responsible for a drop in the district tax rate of 22%.

Hansen says that he is being forced to run a second time for the same office and that the process trying to drive him from the board will , in the long run, discourage qualified and dedicated candidates from entering the public arena — a factor which hurts the public in the end.






Realtors: time is right to buy home

The following article first appeared in the Sunday, May 21, 1967 edition of “The Ojai Valley News and Oaks Gazette” on Page A-4. That newspaper in now the “Ojai Valley News”. The article is reprinted here with their permission. The author is unknown.

Realtors: time is right to by home

“The Time is Right to Buy a Home” is the theme of the 1967 Realtor Week celebration this week by the 75 members of the Ojai Valley Board of Realtors, Effie Skelton, board president, announced today.

In honor of Realtor Week, a number of observances have been scheduled as Realtors in this area join with their more than 85,000 colleagues across the nation directing public attention to their calling and special character of the services they render.

“A Realtor,” said Mrs. Skelton , “is a profession in real estate who subscribes to a strict code of ethics as a member of the local and state boards and the National Associations of Real Estate Boards.”

The term Realtor, which is a coined term and trademark, can be used only by members of the National Association and its local boards.

In discussing the Code of Ethics, it was one of the first such codes adopted in the history of American business. Under it 30 articles which cover all aspects of real estate transaction, Realtors pledge fair treatment and their total real estate knowledge to both parties of a contract — the buyer and seller.

Realtor week will continue through Saturday, May 27. The slogan this year underscores the resourcefulness of Realtors throughout the nation. For the prospective buyer who is experiencing a little difficulty in securing financing for property, the Realtor can suggest new money sources. For the family which needs more space for growth, the Realtor can fill their needs, both as to size and cost.

The local board was founded in 1962. The parent group, the National Association or Real Estate Boards, was founded in 1908, with offices in Washington, D.C. and Chicago.

1967 will continue to be a busy year for the Ojai Valley Board of Realtors. Last year some members assisted in the Heart Fund Drive, others with the Ojai Valley Museum, one on the Architectural Board, also, a committee working with the high school, in which the board is sponsoring an essay contest for a Calif. Real Estate Assn. scholarship. The board will enter a float in the 4th of July parade in Ojai.

They received a plaque for first award in 1966. They have committees covering local and civic affairs, as well as legislation.